Where to rent? Preston

Callum Ward, 17 January 2020

In this series, we’re exploring some of our favourite rental hotspots. This week we’ve taken a look at Preston and everything the city has to offer for potential renters, from rent prices to things to do and more.

​Preston is a small, urban city located in Lancashire on the north bank of the River Ribble. The city is full of character thanks to its strong industrial past and is home to Preston North End football club. Preston’s city centre is also in the middle of a massive regeneration, with a number of new restaurants, bars, pubs and shops all being developed as Preston slowly cements its status as a hidden renting gem. Find out

Renting

The average rent for living in Preston is currently at £882pcm according to home.co.uk – almost £100 below the national average of £967pcm. For a one-bedroom property, the average rent comes in at £505pcm and a two-bedroom comes it at £629pcm. Prices start to rise as you get to three and four-bedroom properties with an average rent of £819pcm and £1,161pcm respectively.

The price in Preston varies depending on what kind of property type you’re looking for. The average rent for a house is £1,003pcm compared to £627pcm for a room and £791pcm for a flat. With such a wide range of available property types and sizes on the market potential residents should be able to find exactly what they are looking for.

The city has a number of attractive areas to live thanks to its diverse landscape. Residents have the options of living in areas within walking distance to a plethora of parks and green spaces as well as areas by the River Ribble. The city centre is one of the go-to areas for residents nowadays thanks to the extensive regeneration in recent times. Being close to a wide range of amenities and transport links has proved to be extremely desirable for those looking to rent.

Getting around

Transport in Preston is fantastic. Residents are spoilt for choice when it comes to getting around throughout the city as well as travelling in and out of Preston.

The Preston By-pass is now part of the M6 motorway, with a short section also now forming part of the M55 and offers extremely easy access for those driving to and from Preston. As well as the motorway access, Preston Railway Station offers a multitude of direct and connecting routes including to London Euston, Manchester Victoria, Manchester Airport and Blackpool, with the station being seen as the hub for connecting rail services in the North West.

Getting around the city itself is just as easy as getting there. Preston is served by a number of national bus services – including Stagecoach, National Express and Eurolines – all offering affordable transport throughout the entirety of the city. With Preston being much smaller than the likes of Manchester and Liverpool it makes it even easier to travel throughout either on foot or on a bike. The Guild Wheel – a public footpath and cycle route that encircles the entirety of Preston – is key in enabling people to ride or walk to their desired destination and links the city centre, surrounding villages and countryside all via a 21-mile-long path.

Things to do

For such a small city, Preston has plenty on offer for residents to see and do. One of the biggest attractions the city has to offer is the immense amount of green space. Parks such as the Cuerden Valley Park and Avenham and Miller Parks as well as the aforementioned Preston Guild Wheel allow for relaxing walks filled with nature and greenery.

Preston also has a vibrant and urban city centre to compliment the countryside. Residents will find a large variety of things to do, from food and drink to football games. The city boasts an impressive mix of restaurants, bars and places to eat, each offering a wide selection of cuisines. Some of the local favourites include Paul Heathcote’s Brasserie and Olive Press Restaurant on Winckley Square, DUK and Pond on Cross Street as well as the famous Victorian Preston market that recently underwent a massive refurbishment.

Alongside the food and drink options, the city is full of various experiences for people to experience. Residents can catch a football match at the Deepdale Stadium, visit the Harris Museum, Art Gallery & Library or even take a stroll down by the water. The options are endless, and the city’s unique charm only adds to the experience.

Are you interested in renting in Preston? If so, give our team a call on 0330 134 0155 and we’ll see what we can do for you!


Where to rent? Preston

Callum Ward, 17 January 2020

In this series, we’re exploring some of our favourite rental hotspots. This week we’ve taken a look at Preston and everything the city has to offer for potential renters, from rent prices to things to do and more.

​Preston is a small, urban city located in Lancashire on the north bank of the River Ribble. The city is full of character thanks to its strong industrial past and is home to Preston North End football club. Preston’s city centre is also in the middle of a massive regeneration, with a number of new restaurants, bars, pubs and shops all being developed as Preston slowly cements its status as a hidden renting gem. Find out

Renting

The average rent for living in Preston is currently at £882pcm according to home.co.uk – almost £100 below the national average of £967pcm. For a one-bedroom property, the average rent comes in at £505pcm and a two-bedroom comes it at £629pcm. Prices start to rise as you get to three and four-bedroom properties with an average rent of £819pcm and £1,161pcm respectively.

The price in Preston varies depending on what kind of property type you’re looking for. The average rent for a house is £1,003pcm compared to £627pcm for a room and £791pcm for a flat. With such a wide range of available property types and sizes on the market potential residents should be able to find exactly what they are looking for.

The city has a number of attractive areas to live thanks to its diverse landscape. Residents have the options of living in areas within walking distance to a plethora of parks and green spaces as well as areas by the River Ribble. The city centre is one of the go-to areas for residents nowadays thanks to the extensive regeneration in recent times. Being close to a wide range of amenities and transport links has proved to be extremely desirable for those looking to rent.

Getting around

Transport in Preston is fantastic. Residents are spoilt for choice when it comes to getting around throughout the city as well as travelling in and out of Preston.

The Preston By-pass is now part of the M6 motorway, with a short section also now forming part of the M55 and offers extremely easy access for those driving to and from Preston. As well as the motorway access, Preston Railway Station offers a multitude of direct and connecting routes including to London Euston, Manchester Victoria, Manchester Airport and Blackpool, with the station being seen as the hub for connecting rail services in the North West.

Getting around the city itself is just as easy as getting there. Preston is served by a number of national bus services – including Stagecoach, National Express and Eurolines – all offering affordable transport throughout the entirety of the city. With Preston being much smaller than the likes of Manchester and Liverpool it makes it even easier to travel throughout either on foot or on a bike. The Guild Wheel – a public footpath and cycle route that encircles the entirety of Preston – is key in enabling people to ride or walk to their desired destination and links the city centre, surrounding villages and countryside all via a 21-mile-long path.

Things to do

For such a small city, Preston has plenty on offer for residents to see and do. One of the biggest attractions the city has to offer is the immense amount of green space. Parks such as the Cuerden Valley Park and Avenham and Miller Parks as well as the aforementioned Preston Guild Wheel allow for relaxing walks filled with nature and greenery.

Preston also has a vibrant and urban city centre to compliment the countryside. Residents will find a large variety of things to do, from food and drink to football games. The city boasts an impressive mix of restaurants, bars and places to eat, each offering a wide selection of cuisines. Some of the local favourites include Paul Heathcote’s Brasserie and Olive Press Restaurant on Winckley Square, DUK and Pond on Cross Street as well as the famous Victorian Preston market that recently underwent a massive refurbishment.

Alongside the food and drink options, the city is full of various experiences for people to experience. Residents can catch a football match at the Deepdale Stadium, visit the Harris Museum, Art Gallery & Library or even take a stroll down by the water. The options are endless, and the city’s unique charm only adds to the experience.

Are you interested in renting in Preston? If so, give our team a call on 0330 134 0155 and we’ll see what we can do for you!